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Changing the channel

 

I haven’t published on my blog for quite a while now – mainly due to my roles in public sector and never quite knowing if we were in purdah or if I’d share something I shouldn’t.

For the couple of things I did put out I’ve found LinkedIn is a better platform for me to share stories and ideas.  When I say better I mean I’m able to reach more people, it’s simpler to do and it’s part of a bigger overall picture of who I am and what I think.

At the moment I expect this will be my final post here…if you do want to hear more of my musings in the meantime you can find me on LinkedIn.

It ain’t what you do it’s the way that you do it

….And that’s what gets results

This week I’m speaking with my esteemed colleague Shaun Smith at an agile event.

Individuals and Interactions: The Forgotten Priority

We chose to focus on one of the agile oldies. The first thing we state in the manifesto.  Because people and interactions are usually forgotten when we start to plan for change.  We all too often dive into creating programmes and long term plans and BIG CHANGE.

Our session hopes to attempt to redress this balance,  challenge some assumptions and make sense of why this is.  Or maybe we’ll just tell some stories.  Depends on the people present and what would be more enjoyable and useful for them.

See what I did?

We chose to put the people over the process (or in this case the powerpoint)

We won’t plan it to death and we have one simple outcome –  to help people think about how they interact with people when planning and inspiring and managing change.


“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”
― Maya Angelou

Scrum Values and The Duality of Openness

The best weapon of a dictatorship is secrecy, but the best weapon of a democracy should be the weapon of openness.   
Niels Bohr 
 
Openness is synonymous with transparency, and this requires candid and frank communication.  The most important word in the previous sentence is communication – if this isn’t happening then openness is simply impossible.   This can be a challenging value to hold dear and is particularly difficult to achieve if respect and courage are not yet instilled, and even more difficult it trust is yet to be established – this is probably why Commitment is the first value!  Anyone affected by conversations and decisions must be made aware as soon as possible – and without disrupting their current focus.   Openness needs to be considered at the highest levels of the organisation. Consider distributed, multiple teams facing a common impediment. There is little opportunity for passive communication and it’s probably something that is not within a single team’s control – in this situation openness becomes essential to everyone. Read More

What is Agile Coaching?

All too often people forget what was learned in a training session or struggle to apply what they have learned to real-life.  Coaching enhances and extends training by helping people to understand what they have learned and how they can leverage it to their advantage in a real-life situation.  Coaches work closely with you and your people, pulling information from across the organisation and supporting you in defining what success looks like.  An Agile Coach will help you set goals and support you in discovering the right way for your organisation to use Agile to your advantage.

Coaching can be effective for short and long term purposes.  Short term coaching is usually focused on specific activities, for example coaching a team’s planning meeting or helping groom

Read More

Scrum Values and The Tale of the Cowardly Cow

Today I was self-respecting – as I often do towards the end of an engagement – and found myself looking for inspirational quotes around opportunity..of which plenty abounds in India.  As I considered everything I happened upon in the last six months, both professional and personal, I realise that I have been lacking in something.  Courage.

As I tried to focus on when and where and how to improve I began to correlate with Scrum values.  Over the last several years these ideals became so embedded in my way of working that I simply forgot about them..and recent exploration has confirmed my fears – that most people who are actively pursuing or practicing Scrum are also lacking in conscious knowledge of these core ideals.    I only recall ever seeing these in black and white in the very first Scrum book I read by Ken Schwaber Read More

Agile Ah-ha’s

I spend as much of my time reading and investigating the coaching side of my business, as I do in keeping up-to-date with Agile.  I also spend a considerable amount of time learning about psychology, anthropologies and general management theory..and all of the above play an integral role in shaping how I chose to interact with teams or individuals  I coach.

Take Agile games for example… Read More

Agile Principles in Practice @ Scrum Bangalore

Thanks to Isense Prowareness for another fabulous Scrum meetup. It seems that Scrum and Agile continue to grow exponentially here in India, I could swear the crowd doubled from the last meetup!    For those of you in Bangalore it’s worthwhile signing up to come along – lunch is even provided!

This time I was one of the main presenters, alongside Jesse Fewell and Sanjeev Kumar Mishra – who ran a mean marshmallow challenge!

Anyway I digress – it is early Sunday morning  – I decided to present on the Agile Principles and thought I’d share it for posterity. Read More